employees temporarily absent from work in August amounted to 808,000

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by Ifi Reporter Category:Capital Market Sep 23, 2020

The Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) publishes data for August, according to which the unemployment rate in the labor force is about 5.4%, compared with 5.1% in July.
The labor force rate of employed persons who were temporarily absent from work all week for reasons related to the Corona virus, plus the unemployed stands at 9.8% (10.3% in the previous month).
The proportion of non-employed people who stopped working due to dismissal or job closure from March 2020, plus the employed who were temporarily absent from work all week due to Corona virus-related causes, along with the unemployed stands at 11.2% (11.9% in the previous month).
In August 2020, the number of employed persons temporarily absent from work for the whole week or part of the week increased by 177,000 compared with the previous month. The number of employees temporarily absent from work all week or part of the week in August 2020 reached 807.7 thousand (636.4 thousand in the previous month).
The highest rate of employed persons absent from work all week or part of the week, of all employed persons, was in the following industries: education (60.5%), arts, entertainment and leisure (35.1%), transport, warehousing, postal and courier services (28.8%), other services (28.6 %), Management and support services (26.2%), accommodation and food services (26.2%).
Of these, the highest rate of absenteeism due to Corona virus-related causes was in the following industries: Arts, Entertainment and Leisure (20.0%), Accommodation and Food Services (19.7%), Other Services (19.0%), Transportation, Warehousing, Postal and Courier Services (16.1%) , Management and support services (14.7%), education (5.1%).
In August 2020, the highest proportion of employees absent from work all week or part of the week, of all employees, was in occupations: academic (35.1%), sales and service workers (24.8%), general clerks and office workers (23.3%), practical engineers, technicians , Agents and similar occupations (22.8%), professional workers in industry and construction and other professional workers (18.2%).
Of these, the highest rate of absenteeism due to Corona virus-related causes was in occupations: sales and service workers (7.8%), practical engineers, technicians, agents and similar occupations (7.5%), general clerks and office workers (7.0%), professional workers In industry and construction and other professional workers (6.8%), with academic professions (3.7%).
The data show that the corona affects workers aged 60 and over slightly more. Thus the highest rate of employed persons absent from work all week or part of the week, of all employed persons, for reasons related to Corona was among those aged 60-64 at 9.5% and among those aged 65 at 10.3%.
In contrast, among those aged 30-34 it is 5.2%, among those aged 55-59 6.4%, among those aged 45-54 about 7.2% and among those aged 25-29 about 6.9%.Since the eve of Rosh Hashanah, less than a week ago about 100,000 employees in the retail, fashion and catering chains have been on unpaid leave (Khalat). This was announced by the Association of Commercial, Fashion and Catering Chains. In recent days.

Data from the Employment Service show that during the Rosh Hashanah holiday and to this day at 7 am, 41,924 new jobseekers were registered. On the other hand, 4,650 men and women reported their return to work to the employment service. However, the Association of Commercial, Fashion and Catering Estimates estimates that in recent days about 100,000 employees of the retail chains have been laid off - including the fashion chains, management, books and more.
The chairman of the union, Dedi Riesel, explained that "most of the trade chains have laid off at least 80% of their employees, so that there are more than 100,000 workers. They have not yet been absorbed into the employment service. " Among the companies that have outsourced employees are the Fox Group, the Castro-Hoodies Group, the Golf Group - including Adika, IKEA, Tempo and more.
As part of the economic plan presented last Thursday by Finance Minister Israel Katz, which has meanwhile been approved, the government is offering businesses that will preserve their employees' workplaces and not send them to Khalat grants in the amount of up to NIS 5,000 per employee. This is despite the widespread damage to the scope of their activities. Last week, the National Insurance Institute estimated that 200,000-300,000 workers would go to the IDF in the current wave.
At the height of the first wave of the corona, the number of job seekers in Israel crossed the one million mark. The Ministry of Finance hopes that the grant offered to employers who will retain employees will help reduce the number of employees in the Knesset. Although the Ministry of Finance speaks of a grant of up to NIS 5,000 for a non-Knesset employee, in practice many businesses will be eligible To Khalat as they did in the first closure. Another reason for the apparent failure of the outline is the employers' lack of confidence that the Treasury will indeed keep its promises within a reasonable period of time.
NIS 1 billion was allocated for the grant for the retention of workers during the closure period. The specifications of the outline indicate that the grant will be calculated according to the level of injury in the annual turnover and the number of employees who were not excluded from the labor force. If the business is affected by 60% -80% of its revenues, and 70% for a business that is affected by 40% -60% of its revenues.
The Employment Service reports that of the job seekers registered since September 17, 38,288 were registered due to unpaid vacation expenses (91% of those registered), and 3,636 for other reasons. Today, 779,737 jobseekers are registered with the employment service, of which 453,066 are on unpaid leave.

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